The business of love

Yes, I know Valentine’s Day has come and gone but I promise this blog is not about actual love. Those who consider the prospect of finding the perfect present a challenge should be glad they don’t live in China – which has not one, not two, not three… but FOUR love-centred holidays that come with the expectation of gifts. Whether you love or hate these traditions, brands are embracing the notion of love in marketing and reaping the rewards. Why? Because love means big business!

Let me break it down.

Little Red Book

While the term Little Red Book in China may previously have brought Chairman Mao’s book of the same name to mind, today’s Chinese may associate it with something altogether different.

Little Red Book – the go-to online retailer for overseas luxury goods

Little Red Book – Xiao Hong Shu in Chinese – is an app that has attracted over 17 million consumers and $200 million in annual merchandise sales in just 3 years. Things don’t look to be slowing down, with the company recently having raised $120 million from major investors such as TenCent and ZhenFund.

MultiConnexions Director highlights ‘visiting auntie syndrome’ at ‘Diversity Delivers’ IAA Thought Leadership Breakfast Forum

It was a packed house this morning at Doltone House, Sydney for the ‘Diversity DeliversIAA Thought Leadership Breakfast Forum hosted by Mumbrella, where leading diversity/ industry experts were in agreement for the incontestable business case for diversity. Ipsos Australia research indicates that organisations with ethnic and gender diversity at senior levels are financially outperforming their competitors – this is sometimes referred to as ‘The Diversity Dividend’.

During the lively and fascinating panel discussion, which touched on ‘how leading brands are leveraging diversity to deliver better ROI, improved creative outcomes and meaningful insights’, MultiConnexions Director of Strategy and Insights, Kaiyu Li highlighted a phenomenon he called, ‘visiting auntie syndrome’.

The typical Australian’s slang

A slow grin spread across my face this afternoon when leading Australian marketing trade publication B&T’s newsletter hit my inbox, and I read the blurb attached to an article titled: Four’ N Twenty Campaigns To Save our Slang.

“Hunt is on to find top Aussie slang,” read the blurb. “We’d like to nominate ‘merci beaucoup’ and 这些馅饼是可怕的,” quipped B&T’s editor.

The French phrase ‘thank you very much’ and the Chinese phrase ‘this pie is awful’ above were obvious nods to Australia’s truly remarkable multiculturalism.

We are Global

Why should brands invest in speaking to the new audiences in Australia? This is a question often asked by marketers. And there can be no better answer than what I see outside Emporium Melbourne at 5:00 am this fairly chilly morning. There are more than 60 young Asians already waiting patiently in the queue to purchase the Yeezy Boost 350 V2 –new Kanye West sneakers.

They look pretty well settled in their light fold up chairs, and look like they may have been there all night. A $250 pair can be sold online I am told by one informed youngster for $600 – a tidy profit. I take a quick walk before heading to the airport and watch a deal being done. One young guy sold his place in the queue for $200 to another punter.

Listen up Australia! Language matters.

The MultiConnexions team recently unearthed an insightful article that was published in WeForum.org titled, ‘These are the most powerful languages in the world’ written by Kai Chan, Distinguished Fellow, INSEAD Innovation and Policy Initiative.

In my role as Creative Writing/Language Lead, I get to experience the power of languages every day. Language matters. It breaks barriers, creates meaningful conversations and forges powerful connections that help companies and their customers understand one another better.

Rule the roost with great guanxi

Lunar New Year (commonly called Chinese New Year) is one of the oldest and most important traditions in Asian culture. On the 28th of January, 2017 celebrations will come to a crescendo as we enter the ostentatious ‘Year of The Rooster’. This is tenth sign of the Chinese zodiac, and the rooster is generally said to be loyal, sociable and friendly (albeit, a little bossy). While celebrations go on for several weeks, the Lunar New Year period is typically a time when Chinese and other East Asian families come together with their family and friends to honour traditions, to enjoy each other’s company and to hope for a bright future.

That’s Numberwang for you

Last week, the MCX team attended the ReTHINK TV Marketing Forum in Doltone House, Jones Bay Wharf – Sydney, where there were plenty of fascinating insights as well as facts and figures showcased by industry leaders and corporate heavyweights. Among them was Tess Alps, the charismatic and passionate Chair of Thinkbox – the marketing body for commercial TV in the UK, who delivered an engaging speech on her vision for the future of television.

Diwali – A missed opportunity for marketers?

Diwali (or Deepavali) is one of the biggest festivals celebrated by South Asians all over the world. It holds great spiritual significance and is the celebration of good trumping evil where fireworks and lanterns are lit, colourful glad-rags are worn, and delicious traditional sweets are exchanged over a period of 4 days.

And as the festivities are wrapping up (this year it ran from October 30 to November 3), it is the perfect time to reflect on whether or not this festival was a missed opportunity for Australian brands and marketers.

Five Tips for Engaging Multicultural Diasporas this Festive Season

Australia’s multicultural environment is no secret, and marketers cannot afford to ignore the spending power of ‘new audience’ Diasporas.

This Festive Season, connect with ‘new audience’ Diasporas and tap into their enormous marketing potential by tying in with cultural festivities.